Utah Museum of Contemporary Art

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This collection includes documentation of exhibitions, installations, artwork and other related materials from the Utah Museum of Contempory Art in Salt Lake City, Utah.


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Jonathan Horowitz, Your Land / My Land: Election 2012
A special exhibition coinciding with the 2012 American Presidential Election. The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art joins the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, the New Museum in New York, and other museums across the United States to present Jonathan Horowitz’s Your Land/My Land: Election ’12—a special exhibition coinciding with the 2012 American Presidential Election. Your Land/My Land: Election ’12 is a reimagined installation originally presented by Horowitz during the 2008 presidential election. At each location (as in ’08), red and blue area rugs will divide the exhibition space into opposing zones, reflecting America’s color-coded, political, and cultural divide. Back-to-back monitors will be suspended between the carpets, with one broadcasting a live feed of Fox News, the other of MSNBC. The space created by Horowitz will provide a location for people to gather and watch coverage of as well as talk about the presidential election. The installation’s central trope is a divided United States swathed in only red and blue. According to Horowitz, “If race and gender were the defining themes of the ’08 election, economic policy and economic disparity will likely be the defining themes of the 2012 election. The placement of the lyrics will extend this metaphor to the land of the museum and the land outside. To some, museums are decidedly blue—elitist bastions of liberalism—to others, they are lynch-pins of a capitalist art market analogous to other capitalist markets that have been collapsing around us.” When Your Land/My Land opens, a portrait of President Obama, as the current representative of all Americans, will hang from the ceiling between the two sides and a portrait of Mitt Romney will sit on the floor. On election night, each venue will host an election returns event, with the installation becoming a minimalist backdrop. If Obama wins, the position of the two portraits will remain the same. Should Obama be unseated, their positions will be switched. Exhibition held in the New Genres Gallery space., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Joshua Luther: Meaning
A meditation on the relationship between meaning and language. Joshua Luther’s multi-media exhibition is an exciting invitation for visitors to take a step back from the language that we all too often take for granted, and instead contemplate why it is that we are prepared to argue, fight, and sometimes die over various combinations of letter and syllables. Luther received his BFA at Utah State University and his MFA from University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Luther’s work is deeply influenced by his studies of epistemology and linguistics. Exhibition held in the Locals Only Gallery space., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Jun Kaneko: "...the issue of scale is one thing you cannot avoid."
This exhibit includes large-scale paintings and drawings, larges-scale ceramics, glass and bronze works, as well as site-specific installations of a tile wall and striped laminated glass spiral. This is a rare opportunity for viewers to draw visual connections among the five different media and to appreciate the range/magnitude of this remarkable artist's experience and skill. Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.
Kazuo Kadonaga: Wood Paper Bamboo Glass
Exploring twenty years of the artist's work in wood, paper, bamboo and glass. Kadonaga eliminates all arbitrary elements from his art, seeking to demonstrate the inherent composition and the qualities of natural materials. His work is distinguished by a direct engagement with the physical properties of materials--wood, bamboo, paper or glass--and a system that makes visible the hidden activity of seemingly static matter. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Ken Little: Little Changes: A Retrospective
The images depicted in Little's art--the animals, people, cars and houses, may be autonomous replicas of what they represent, but they are also, even in their bizarre configuration, objects that are infused with a sense of comical affection. His work crosses many boundaries-- specifically those between art and craft, caricature and satire. His sculptures and installations portray the attributes of humans and animals and the ways these attributes are assimilated into social custom. The characters he creates through this process cut through rage, humor, frustration, and joy in a fashion similar to that of cartoons. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Koichi Yamamoto
Prints by Koichi Yamamoto. Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Kumi Yamashita
When viewing Kumi Yamashit'a's ingenious art, we confront our simple notion that solid predicts shadow--that a picket pence will cast a series of parallel lines on the sidewalk; the little girl on the street will have a ghostly twin running beside her. The notion of the truthfulness of shadows is the basis of a story by the ancient Roman historian Pliny the Elder, who wrote of a young woman who traced on a wall the shadow cast by her departing lover's head. The tale, which became popularly known as the "invention of painting," was a common subject of eighteenth-century European art. The creation of silhouettes captivated Europe at the same time and became known in France as "ombremanie"--shadow mania. As in the Roman tale, the sitter's head was lit from the side. The shadow the profile cast onto paper was traced and cut out. Many believed the character of the sitter could be read from this image--that the appearance and personality of the sitter were truly reflected in the shadow silhouette. Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Lawn Gnomes: Eat Your Hearts Out
Residents of Salt Lake City and its immediate environs are invited to participate in the first annual Lawn Gnomes Eat Your Hearts Out lawn sculpture competition and extravaganza, hosted by the 337 Project and Salt Lake Art Center! This is a chance to shine for artists who want to show off their innovation, skill, and quirkiness in the creation of our community’s best lawn sculpture!!! Lawn Gnomes is your chance to bring art outside the walls of the Art Center and into the places where people work, live, and play, encouraging everyone to think about new ways to actively engage with our city and neighborhoods. Salt Lake Art Center will present maps and tours in a variety of formats that lead residents from the Art Center’s formal galleries into the reimagined urban space created by artists participating in Lawn Gnomes Eat Your Hearts Out. The front lawn is a private plot of land that is publicly visible, and functions in urban and suburban society as an important signifier of taste, individualism and community. Lawns are a teeny slice of utopia: they can proclaim your political position, your ecological philosophy, your domestic ideal! Let your lawn be your canvas and be creative in your use of materials! Your contribution can be anything as long as it utilizes your lawn, abides by city zoning and building codes and any other applicable laws, and is suitable for audiences of all ages. You can build a sculpture, a garden, a flower-painting, a landscape, a fantasyland…be creative!!!!! You can even create your artwork on property owned by a friend or neighbor (if they give you permission). Exhibition held in Salt Lake city and its Immediate Environs., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Legends of Entelechy
Personal experiences serve as the point of inception for this collaborative body of work by these Utah artists, through the use of paintings, mixed media prints, and mixed media sculpture each artist relates to his story of the viewers. Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Liberties Under Fire: The ACLU of Utah at 50
In celebration of and in collaboration with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Utah, and in honor of their 50 years of advocacy in defending civil liberties, the Salt Lake Art Center has organized “Liberties Under Fire.” This exhibition features artwork by five artists who depict or suggest pivotal civil liberties issues identified by the ACLU of Utah. To provide informed and unique perspectives about each issue, six prominent authors have been invited to write short personal essays. And to place these artworks and essays in a legal framework, the ACLU of Utah has provided short texts related to each issue. The root issue is the First Amendment – freedom of speech and expression – which is explored in an introduction by Katharine Coles, PhD, Utah Poet Laureate and Professor of English, University of Utah. The five civil liberties issues addressed by pairings of artists and writers include: Abuse of Power: artist Sue Coe and author Forrest S. Cuch; Church and State: artist Enrique Chagoya and author Terry Tempest Williams; LGBT Equality: artist John Trobaugh and playwright Julie Jensen; Racial Justice: artist Kara Walker and author Forrest Crawford; and, Torture, Imprisonment, and War: artist Jenny Holzer and author/journalist Mary Dickson. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery space., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Life After Death: New Leipzig Paintings from the Rubell Family Collection
This exhibition presents the country's foremost collection of paintings and drawings, 68 in all, from the New Leipzig School - a collection built by the Rubell Family in Miami. The seven prominent artists featured are from the esteemed Leipzig Art Academy in Germany and have been hailed as "the 21st century's first bona fide artistic phenomenon." Exhibition held in the Main, Projects and Street Level Galleries., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.
Looking Back: 75 Years At The Salt Lake Art Center
This small exhibition is an imperfect reflection of the long and remarkable history of the Salt Lake Art Center. The artists chosen have been important and influential over much of its seventy-five year life, as well as in the broader arena of Utah's cultural community. Many taught at the Art Barn or at the art Center, some were students there, or speak warmly of having been influenced in their artistic growth by exhibitions or other events. Most have had solo exhibitions there, many more that once, and all of them, to some degree, have considered the Art Center their artistic "home." Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.

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