Utah Museum of Contemporary Art

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This collection includes documentation of exhibitions, installations, artwork and other related materials from the Utah Museum of Contempory Art in Salt Lake City, Utah.


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Expanded Field: ISC
Expanded Field: The International Sculpture Center exhibition of 2010 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award Competition Winners is a showcase of outstanding interdisciplinary sculptural works from 19 talented student artists. With captivating displays of skill as well as concept, the works in this exhibition range from performative video, carved crayons, a masking tape boat engine, and a massive graphite carving, showing the most cutting edge ideas in sculpture from around the country today. Each year the International Sculpture Center (ISC) presents this competition to its member colleges and universities. The award, founded in 1994, was created in order to support and recognize the work of young sculptors, and to encourage their continued commitment to the field of sculpture as well as to recognize the award winners’ faculty sponsors and their institutions. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery space., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Fab Ab: New Acrylic Abstraction
The seven artists in the exhibition "Fab Ab: New Acrylic Abstraction" approach the use of acrylics differently and, as a result, achieve different modes of abstraction. From artworks rooted in the period following 1940s and 1950s Abstract Expressionism, including Post-Painterly Abstraction and Op Art of the 1960s and 1970s, to styles paying homage to automotive and surfboard design and fabrication, Fab Ab represents a range of national and international trends. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.
Fall 1995 Exhibitions
Pamphlet for the Fall exhibitions at SLAC. Exhibitions include: "Cohabitation" by Kaiti Slater in the Main Gallery and "Dear Mr. Ripley...Treasures from the Ripley's Believe It or Not! Archive" in the Upper Gallery., Original version: Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA); Archival digital version: SLCC Digital Archives.
Fall 1996 Newsletter
Newsletter created by the Salt Lake Art Center information about SLAC, hours, events, history, current exhibitions in the Main Gallery, "As They See It: Contemporary Landscapes by Utah Artists," "The Reality of Abstraction'" the Upper Gallery, "Surface," "In an Abstract Light: Time Gallagher, Bob Bauer, and Bill Lee," upcoming exhibits and events., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Fallen Fruit of Utah
MEET THE ARTISTS OF FALLEN FRUIT on the corner of 9th South and 9th East for a Nocturnal Fruit Forage. Bring a picker and some old grocery bags and hunt for free fruit in the public way. Fallen Fruit of Utah brings together two types of collections through the common ground of fruit. One is sweeping – museums and historical archives – and the other is personal and intimate. Fruit is seen both as deeply symbolic and simply decorative, both ordinary and special, sometimes at the same time. Eight historic collections and archives and over twenty families agreed to collaborate with the artists of Fallen Fruit to assemble works that range from spiritual and symbolic to representational landscapes to the commonplace (or everyday objects). This exhibition draws our attention to the meaning of fruit, a way to investigate symbolism, the aesthetics of deliciousness, and the bounty and goodness of the familiar. The artists of Fallen Fruit use fruit as their lens to look at how we live in the modern world, at ideas of community and at new forms of citizenship. Fruit can be a subject, an object, a noun, a thing, or a symbol. Fruit often triggers a childhood memory – it’s emotional, universal, familiar to most everyone on the planet. Many of these things are linked to place and family, and many echo a sense of connection with something very primal and good. Fallen Fruit is David Burns, Matias Viegener and Austin Young. When you reap the harvest of your land, you shall not reap all the way to the edges of your field, or gather the gleanings of your harvest. You shall not pick your vineyard bare, or gather the fallen fruit of your vineyard; you shall leave them for the poor and the stranger. –Leviticus 19:9-10. Exhibition held in Main Gallery Space., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Fast Forward: Growing Up in the Shadow of Hollywood
This exhibit features 43 photographs by Lauren Greenfield, documenting the experience of young people growing up in Southern California in the mid 1990s. While the photographs themselves are specific to one unique geographic location, the issues and experiences that are examined could be part of the teen experience anywhere. The youths struggle with the influence of wealth, racial and economic prejudice, drugs, sex and an image-based culture that glorifies youth, beauty and celebrity. Greenfield's photographs of Beverly Hills teens working out with personal trainers are set next to images of East Los Angeles graffiti artists. In all cases, whether recording the rich or poor, the overall impression is that to grow up as a teenager in Los Angeles is to grow up quickly, as both the illusions of Hollywood and the neighborhood peer pressure of the youth culture itself dominate the lives and rituals of the young. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Fay Jones
Paintings by Fay Jones. Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Final Light: V. Douglas Snow in Retrospect
Salt Lake Art Center and the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) are pleased to present Final Light: V. Douglas Snow in Retrospect, a joint exhibition celebrating the work of eminent Utah artist Doug Snow (1927-2009). Opening on August 31, 2011, the exhibition will showcase a large body of work presented in two locations, and will debut with a free public celebration at both venues on opening night. A painter, printmaker, and professor, Doug Snow lived and worked in Utah’s red rock country for over half a century. Snow began his formal art training in 1946 at the American Art School and Columbia University in New York City, and finished his degrees at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomsfield Hills, Michigan. After concluding his studies, Snow moved back to his home state of Utah to paint Capitol Reef’s mesas and mountains. In 1957 Snow was featured in Life magazine, establishing him as a nationally recognized artist at the age of 30. He became a devoted educator, working as a professor in the University of Utah Department of Art for 35 years, and serving as department chair from 1966-1971. Today, Snow’s artwork is part of numerous local and national collections, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, the Springville Museum of Art, and the Museum of Art at Brigham Young University. Organized by guest curator Frank McEntire, Final Light: V. Douglas Snow Retrospective presents defining works from Snow’s career, featuring 35 paintings from private and public collections across the West. The retrospective exhibition examines Snow’s early Abstract Expressionist-inspired period from the 1950s, as well as later works from the last three decades of his life, which meld abstraction with realism to express his passion for Utah’s southern desert. By visiting both venues, art lovers will be offered a comprehensive view look at the life and art of Doug Snow. Salt Lake Art Center will present 21 intimate works by Snow, on view through October 22, 2011, and the UMFA will display 14 large-scale paintings by the artist through January 8, 2012. Exhibition held in the Street Gallery Space., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Fresh Ink: Prints From Flatbed Press
This exhibit is a collection of prints from Flatbed Press by various artist. Printmaking workshops such as Flatbed are said to have a "personality." From Listening to artists' responses to their work here, their personality seems to consist of two traits. On the personal level,openness and friendliness prevail, with Katherine's down-home style setting the tone. On the aesthetic level, they became known early on for their "Texas Grit" look, exemplified by the editions of artists like James Surls, Terry Allen, and Frank X. Tolbert. As they expanded their range of artists, the gritty look became complicated by prints that were not"Texas Raw," but simply bold in execution, or, large in scale. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.
Friese Undine: Machiavelli and the Bottle
Undine is fascinated with propaganda and more overt activities of persuasion: brainwashing, coercion, enticement and threat. In this exhibit, what might Undine's intention be? Proselytism? But for what? And certainly satire. This artist obviously wants us to think about the everyday uses of force, and especially the rhetoric we use to justify our actions to those less powerful than we are. Like every satire from the classical Greek "Satyricon" to Voltaire's "Candide" to "Saturday Night Live," Undine's work attacks society in order to improve it, ironically a hopeful act. Whether we are shocked or we laugh or both, we should not leave this gallery feeling neutral. If giving people easy answers is the function of propaganda, asking people hard questions is the function of art. Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Frontage Road
"Frontage Road" explores the timelessness of these issues and their relationship to the conditions of contemporary society. These artists, referencing personal experience, reveal the tensions of displacement, the realities of friendship, the clarity of isolation, and the disparity of dreams. The perspectives of each artist, David, Aden, and John, are significant. They as us to become involved in their investigation. We must examine our lives. We must make conscious our personal assessment. And we must acknowledge our individual responsibilities to a more enlighten and compassionate community. Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Gary Hill: Language Willing
Video affords Mr. Hill access to another dimension-time-that may do for the contemporary viewer what inverted eyes and noses did decades ago. By juxtaposing visual and audible information on a screen and orchestrating the consumption of that image through editing, Mr. Hill in a way reintroduces the viewer to time and how it shapes aesthetic experience. The show is comprised of four major installations, "Wall Piece" (2000), "Language Willing" (2002), Accordions" (2001-2002), "Crossbow" (1999), each with a unique focus. Exhibition held in the Main and Street Level Gallery spaces., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.

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