Utah Museum of Contemporary Art

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This collection includes documentation of exhibitions, installations, artwork and other related materials from the Utah Museum of Contempory Art in Salt Lake City, Utah.


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Cris Bruch: Dreaming Doing Craving
The exhibition "Cris Bruch: Dreaming Doing Craving" acts as a seventeen year survey of work by this Seattle-based artists. The exhibition occupies the Salt Lake Art Center's entire exhibition space, with the earlier socially-conscious shopping cart sculptures exhibited in the smaller Street Level Galley and the more recent, exquisitely-crafted sculptures shown in the cavernous Main Gallery. What will be quickly realized upon entering this exhibition is that here is an artist who has a highly expressive social consciousness who also happens to make beautiful objects. Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery and Main Level Gallery spaces., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Crossroads: A Teen Response to Life in Salt Lake City
A diverse group of high school students from throughout the Salt Lake Valley came together to create "Crossroads: A Teen Response Life in Salt Lake City," a two-part exhibit consisting of photographic works and a multimedia collaboration between the Salt Lake Art Center and Spy Hop Productions, a local non-profit Media Studio. "Crossroads: A Teen Response Life in Salt Lake City" was comprised of over 600 photographs that give give the viewers a "real-life" look into Salt Lake's youth culture. Exhibit held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Dana Costello: Territories of the Self - Mailer
The paintings are simple; each features a female figurine clothed in Victorian-style dress, buckle shoes and white tights, placed in a lunar landscape and surrounded by imaginary plants. Exhibition held in the Street Level Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
David Baddley: Peace Garden
Salt Lake City photographer David Baddley has recorded his city's international peace garden, located in Jordan Park, along the banks of the Jordan River on the west side of town. Baddley's photographs were taken on a cold, slowness winter day, at the time of year when he ponds have been drained and the vegetation is in a dormant state. Photographed in black and white, Badldley's pictures are unapologetically straight forward. Exhibition held in the Projects Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.
David Kimball Anderson: To Morris Graves
California-based sculptor David Kimball Anderson pays homage to the late Abstract Expressionist painter Morris Graves through his installation of cast bronze and steel sculptures which are based on the vase forms in Graves' flower paintings., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.
David Ruhlman: A History of the Hidden World
David Ruhlman’s mixed media paintings are visual palindromes reflecting the circular nature of beginnings and endings. A History of the Hidden World is an exploration of double entendres, surreal metamorphosis and natural phenomena. These themes relate to apocalypticism and how this mysterious fantasy spawns concepts of beauty and transcendence. Drawing on French playwright Antonin Artaud who used strange and disturbing effects to perplex his audience, Ruhlman’s work depicts peculiar and anthropomorphic motifs that lead viewers through hidden worlds. The artist experiments with form, color and texture, resulting in his own unique visual language. Recurring images of rams, reptiles, birds and fragmented figures tell stories that are not linear, but rather are repetitive trajectories of whimsical fable. A History of the Hidden World is a mirror to another dimension where meaning and imagination are wound together in layered knots of symbols and forms. One is able to trace an undiscovered history that continually reflects back on itself, neither beginning with a starting point nor providing a final conclusion. What is left is a new world order that does not implicate perfection or organization in the traditional sense, but allows for an unruly explosion of continual wonder and possibility. Exhibition held in the Locals Only Gallery space., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Deference to Deffebach
The exhibition honors the legacy of Lee Deffebach (1928-2005), one of Utah's most talented artists. The exhibit features six paintings that provide ample evidence of Deffebach's originality, her unabashed love of color. As she expressed it, her abstract paintings were based on an intuitive and tactile experience that was only possible through an engagement with the painting process itself. In her view, the shapes and colors of nature seen and felt, do not emerge from a preconceived rendering of reality, but rather as a result of the integrity of the painting process, especially through spontaneous acts. Her depictions of nature are a metaphorical not literal. In this sense she adheres to Greenberg's insistence that Abstract Expressionism can only be a valid expression if it evolves "solely on its own terms." Exhibition held in the Projects Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.
Displacement: The Three Gorges Dam and Contemporary Chinese Art
The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangzi River in China is a massive project entwined in controversy. When finally completed, it will stand as the world’s largest generator of hydroelectric power, with a yearly output equal to that of fifty million tons of coal or fifteen nuclear power plants. However, the dam’s 375 mile reservoir has already displaced over one million people and submerged over one thousand towns and villages. This exhibition presents work that four leading contemporary Chinese artists—Chen Qiulin, Yun-Fei Ji, Liu Xiaodong, and Zhuang Hui—have created in response to the dam. Despite differences in backgrounds and artistic practices, these artists have engaged with the theme of displacement, responding to the movement of people, the demolition of old towns and construction of new cities, and the astonishing changes the project is bringing to the local landscape. Through the powerful artworks and extensive educational programs, Displacement offers nuanced, thought-provoking perspectives on a project of great social, environmental, and global concern. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery space., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Doublespeak
Doublespeak features artworks by an international roster of contemporary women artists who utilize strategies of layered or multiple meanings to address politically, sexually or socially difficult subject matter. This exhibition will examine feminine perspectives on politics, war and gender, including exploration of the role of women as authors, victims, bystanders, soldiers, commentators, and caretakers. Each of the artists in Doublespeak comes from a perspective of dual-identity in one way or another (in terms of culture, religion, sexual identity, etc.). The exhibition draws its initial inspiration from the work of female Vietnamese poet Hô Xuân Hu’o’ng, a pioneer more than 200 years ago in the use of literary double-entendres that engaged philosophical quandaries of life and death as well as daily conflicts between men and women. Writing in Vietnamese, Hô ultilized the tonal nature of the language to create poems that had one meaning when read with a given tonality, and an entirely different, discreet meaning when read with the alternate tonality or pronunciation. There is a long history of women using codes to get their message across – from the centuries-old language Nüshu, used by Chinese women in the Hunan province, to the secret quilt codes of the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War. This exhibition offers contemporary examples of such cultural codes. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery Space., Digital image files converted from Raw file format to TIFF using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.
Edith Carlson: Paintings
The movement of light and color is the subject of Edith Carlson's paintings. Her canvases almost breathe, their geometric forms imbued with a radiance that seems to emanate from the multiple paint layers infused with nearly imperceptible gradations of color. Color and light advance and recede, shift as one walks past or observes from a distance, gain fresh perspective as effects first unseen are newly discerned. Even at night, and with the passing of the seasons, the paintings assume a particular kind of color and glow that is often dramatically different from that of the day. in these nuances of movement are found the magic of Edith Carlson's work. Exhibition held in the Main Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe
Eileen Doktorski: Domestic Arsenal
The installation is an overwhelming mound of objects-turned-weapons, either found or donated to the project or cast in ceramic or bronze, surrounded by walls plastered with news reports. It is an indictment and verdict, a memorial and a shrine, revealing the horrors of domestic violence, Doktorski is a sculpture professor at Utah State University. Exhibition held in the Projects Gallery space., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe Acrobat.
Examining Hospice Care in Utah
A free public symposium. Eight internationally-recognized photographers and filmmakers were commissioned to create new work about the emotional and collaborative experience of working with hospices and hospice care. Each immersed themselves, over an extended period of time and in different cities, in the world of the people who know it best: patients, families and health care providers. "Hospice: a Photographic Inquiry" held March 31 - June 10, 2001., TIFF image scanned at 600 dpi from the original using an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner. PDF created with Adobe

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